Lofthouse Park Case Study 3: Hermann J. Held, Law Student

Hermann J. Held was one of a number of German students and tutors detained as enemy aliens when war broke out in August 1914. He was sent to Lofthouse Camp on 21 October 1914 and transferred to Knockaloe Camp on the Isle of Man in April 1918 when Lofthouse Park was given over to the internment of German POWs.    Continue reading

Heritage Open Day in Lofthouse, 11 September 2016

Ein Blog-Beitrag von Eva Göbel (17 September 2016)

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Vergessene Geschichte(n): Heritage Open Day in Lofthouse (Foto: Eva Göbel)

Vor Ort erinnert nichts mehr an die wechselhafte Geschichte von Lofthouse Park vor einhundert Jahren: weder an den Freizeitpark, der zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts zur Belebung des Straßenbahngeschäftes angelegt wurde, noch an das Internierungslager für feindliche Ausländer im Ersten Weltkrieg. Lediglich einige Straßennamen knüpfen an die Vergangenheit an.

Vielleicht kamen gerade deshalb so viele Menschen am 11. September 2016 in den Lofthouse Gate Working Men’s Club im Norden Wakefields Continue reading

Lofthouse Park Case Study 2: Otto Froitzheim and Oscar Kreuzer, Tennis Champions

Otto Froitzheim and Oscar Kreuzer were two championship tennis players who had represented the German team against the Australians in the Davis Cup just before the war. They had been playing in the United States at the time, having been beaten by Anthony Wilding and Norman Brookes in one of the preliminary stages of the Davis Cup. News of their internment was reported in January 1916, when a letter sent to Miss Clare Cassell from Otto Froitzheim was published in The Pittsburg Press telling readers of the circumstances surrounding Froitzheim and Kreuzer’s detention in 1914. Continue reading

Lofthouse Park Case Study 1: Paul Cohen-Portheim, painter and writer

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Paul Cohen-Portheim was painting in England at the outbreak of war. An Austrian, Cohen-Portheim had helped design the costumes for a series of operas at the London Opera House in November 1914. He was arrested four months later while at work and first interned at Knockaloe on the Isle of Man. The first part of his book Time Stood Still deals with his internment on the Isle of Man.

Continue reading